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Touring In: Nunavut

Craft: Author & Illustrator

Genre: Picture Books

Ideal Audience Size: 20-35

Maximum Audience Size: 65

Grades: Kindergarten-Grade 3

Special Equipment: Flip chart or blackboard (something to draw on) and a projector (if available).

Website: www.careysookocheff.com

 

2017 Society of Illustrators Original Art Show
2016 OLA Best Bets

Presentation Information

The presentation begins by talking about what Carey does as an author and an illustrator. There is a digital presentation of photos of Carey and her artwork from when she was a kid so the kids realize that she is not very different from them. Carey also shows recent drawings and sketches and talks about becoming an author and illustrator. This is followed by a reading of one or two books and followed up with a drawing demonstration that relates to the book. Throughout the presentation Carey is happy to answer questions and engage in discussion.

SOLUTIONS FOR COLD FEET: This book is about the up and down relationship between a girl and her dog, and also about coming up with creative solutions. A digital presentation shows how this book was inspired by Carey’s own dog, and Carey speaks about how anyone can use inspiration from their own life to create stories. Carey also speaks about coming up with creative and unusual solutions to little problems. She provides some of her own ideas and takes suggestions from the kids while making drawings and sketches of the problems and the solutions. Although this book appears to be for very young readers, the theme of problem solving works for older children too. With older kids Carey can do a mind-mapping exercise where the kids write and draw their own problems and solutions.

WET: This book explores all the many ways we can get wet, from jumping in a pool, to having tears stream down our face. Carey shows through photographs and drawings how personal experiences as a kid inspired this book and how anyone can use the inspiration from their own lives to create stories. She then talks about using an adjective as a starting point for a story. Carey provides some of her own ideas and takes suggestions from the kids while drawing their ideas.

BUDDY and EARL: The Buddy and Earl books are stories of friendship and fun about a dog who likes to play by the rules and a hedgehog who knows no limits. As the illustrator of this series, Carey talks about how an author and an illustrator work together to create a book. She shows the character sketches used to create the characters of Buddy and Earl. Carey then does a drawing demonstration where she shows how to draw the characters and how simple changes to lines can make big changes to their expressions.

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT: As the illustrator of this book, Carey talks about how an author and an illustrator work together to create a book. She shows the character sketches and preliminary drawings, and also speaks about how to use colour to convey different ideas and emotions in the book. She does a drawing demonstration to show how simple changes to lines can make big changes to a character’s expression, and how colour can also change the feeling of a drawing.

 

Book List

What Happens Next
(OwlKids Books, Spring 2018)

Buddy and Earl Meet the Neighbors
(Groundwood, August 2018)

Wet
(Henry Holt, June 2017)

Buddy and Earl Go To School
(Groundwood, August 2017)

Solutions For Cold Feet and Other Little Problems
(Tundra, 2016)

Buddy and Earl and the Great Big Baby
(Groundwood, 2016)

Buddy and Earl Go Exploring
(Groundwood, 2016)

Buddy and Earl
(Groundwood, 2015)

 

Biography

Carey Sookocheff was born in Ottawa but grew up in Western Canada, living in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. After studying illustration at OCAD in Toronto, she worked for a number of years as an editorial illustrator, making images for the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Real Simple and lots of other newspapers and magazines. After having children of her own, she decided to pursue her love of books. Since then she has written two picture books and been the illustrator of four more. She continues to write and draw and has plans for many more books. Carey lives in Toronto with her husband, their two kids and their dog Rosie.

Awards

Wet

  • 2017 Society of Illustrators Original Art Show

Solutions for Cold Feet

  • 2016 Ontario Library Association Best Bets Recommended Reading List for Children

Buddy and Earl and the Great Big Baby

  • 2016 Ontario Library Association Best Bets Recommended Reading List for Children

Buddy and Earl

  • 2016 Selected for the A Bank Street College of Education Best Children’s Books of the Year
  • 2016 Selected for the CCBC Best Books for Children and Teens
  • 2015 Selected for the Boston Globe Best Books of 2015 for Kids
  • 2015 Selected for the 49th Shelf Favourite Picture Books of the Year

 

Praise

“The group of sixty students from three primary classes enjoyed coming together in our school library to hear you read your book Solutions for Cold Feet and other little problems. The students were attentive and engaged during your presentation, particularly interested in how you came up with your creative ideas for the story. They loved seeing the photos in your digital presentation that showed your dog and family, and learning about how they are the inspiration for many of your ideas. The students also enjoyed watching you model for them your style of illustrating. I believe you motivated them to try to create similar drawings in their own art!”

—Sarah Sherman, Teacher-Librarian

“Seeing Carey’s working sketches become finished illustrations in the book really intrigued the children. Focusing on how illustrations are created and become a key part of the story was most interesting. The students work through a similar process of drawing and writing in our writing workshop. The letters the children sent to Carey afterwards showed their enthusiasm for what they experienced during her visit. Carey offered tips, ideas, and inspiration to my budding authors and illustrators. I highly recommend Carey as a visiting illustrator to K-6 classrooms.”

—Lise Hawkins, Grade One Teacher